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INFORMATION ZONE

This section contains health information and tips that we hope will help you protect your oral health.

Save time by booking your next appointment online. New patients can also fill out a medical form in advance to make your first appointment smoother.

We have also included some articles to answer all your questions about oral health and dental care.

For more information, please speak with one of our staff members.

The reference in oral health care –> https://www.maboucheensante.com/en/

INFORMATION ZONE

INFORMATION ZONE

This section contains health information and tips that we hope will help you protect your oral health.

Save time by booking your next appointment online. New patients can also fill out a medical form in advance to make your first appointment smoother.

We have also included some articles to answer all your questions about oral health and dental care.

For more information, please speak with one of our staff members.

The reference in oral health care –> https://www.maboucheensante.com/en/

LES FORMULAIRES

Make an appointment

Make an appointment

To make an appointment, please call us at  514 739-3461 or fill out the form below.

We will confirm your appointment (by phone call or email) or offer you a different appointment time within 24 hours.








Customer satisfaction survey

Customer satisfaction survey

We care about the quality of our services. That’s why we have prepared a short patient survey to measure your level of satisfaction and let us know what needs improving. Your answers will remain anonymous.



Section des patients

Advice For Healthy Gums

Advice For Healthy Gums

As kids, we’re all taught to brush our teeth regularly to keep them healthy. But what about our gums?

The gum is the soft tissue surrounding the neck of teeth which also covers the jawbone. By covering the dental roots, it protects them against microbes. A healthy gum is pink and firm, it attaches around the neck of the teeth and does not bleed when brushing or flossing.

Tips for keeping your gums healthy:

  • Using a soft-bristled brush, gently brush your gums each time you brush your teeth (with a vertical motion from the gum to the tooth).
  • Carefully clean molars and pre-molars (because these teeth are located in the rear portion of the dental arch, they are often neglected, making them more susceptible to plaque buildup).
  • Use dental floss every day to get rid of plaque between your teeth. Make sure the floss reaches just beneath the gumline (be gentle to avoid cutting the gum tissue).
  • Adopt healthy eating habits, focusing on fruits and vegetables and leaving out acidic and over-sweet foods.
  • Avoid tobacco.

Many patients stop using dental floss because of bleeding or pain. However, this is not the solution, as the situation may worsen rather than improve. Bleeding is caused by bacteria found in plaque, causing swelling and bone loss. This is why regular flossing is so important. If pain or bleeding persist after a month, you should go see a dental professional.

In fact, oral health treatments (teeth cleaning) and regular exams are really important to ensure your teeth and gums stay healthy. When left untreated, gum disease can affect the bone that keeps your teeth in place. To avoid complications and, ultimately, the extraction of a tooth, it is best to adopt a preventive approach and seek treatment before problems become worse.

Choosing The Right Toothbrush, Toothpaste & Mouthwash

Choosing The Right Toothbrush, Toothpaste & Mouthwash

Brushing and flossing regularly is important, but you need the right materials to really benefit from your good habits!

The ideal toothbrush

For toothbrushes, we generally advise patients to choose one with soft bristles. If your teeth are very sensitive, a toothbrush with ultra-soft bristles may be prescribed to you. Firm bristles are only suitable for people with tough gums. Generally speaking, synthetic bristles are softer and more hygienic than natural ones, which also tend to be too hard and could damage your gums.

The head of the toothbrush should be relatively small so that it can reach the various surfaces of your teeth. Toothbrush heads range in shape, with some being very simple, others being articulated and others still being quite complex with variable positions and bristle lengths. If you’re not sure what type of toothbrush is best for your mouth, ask your dentist for a recommendation.

Electric toothbrushes are an increasingly popular choice. The best of them have round heads that rotate over your teeth. You may also choose one with a normal head and sonic scan. Electric toothbrushes should be replaced every two years, while manual ones should be thrown away after three months of use. Note that some manufacturers of electric toothbrushes offer models with replaceable head.

So many toothpastes!

First, choose a flavour you like. After all, if you’re not thrilled with the taste, you’ll be much less likely to brush regularly.

Many brands use special phrasing to persuade people to buy their products. But it’s important to know that all types of toothpaste fight cavities, since they all help remove plaque when used properly. They all contain ingredients that are alike and in similar proportions. Most toothpastes contain fluoride, which is known to protect tooth enamel from cavities. Thus, phrasing such as”Fight Cavities” or “Strengthen Enamel” all mean the same.

Even though fluoride is very beneficial for the health of kids’ teeth, you must make sure that little ones don’t swallow toothpaste, or else they can get fluorosis (too much fluoride). This can cause tiny white stains on teeth. For this reason, kids under the age of six should never use more than a pea-size amount of toothpaste.

Antibacterial toothpaste is specially formulated for patients with gingivitis. It contains ingredients that fight against the production of bacteria, and sodium phosphates known to slow down the formation of tartar. If your teeth are sensitive to hot or cold, toothpaste for sensitive teeth can be a great solution to your problem. They are with desensitizing agents whose effects are felt from a few hours to a few days. The benefits are rarely immediate, hence the importance of using the product daily. If you’re wondering whether either of these products might be right for you, ask your dentist for advice first.

We’ve all heard of toothpaste that’s supposed to whiten teeth. However, consumers should be aware that these products can’t yield the same results as whitening treatments. In fact, they are meant to restore the natural colour of the tooth which is naturally not white. They remove certain stains such as wine, coffee or cigarette. Much like the whitening treatments offered in dental offices, whitening toothpaste is made with peroxide, but it only acts as an abrasive to make the enamel shine. To be effective, it would have to stay in contact with the teeth about 20 minutes! This product is not suitable for everyone and some patients (like those with irritable bowel syndrome or pregnant women) should stay away from it altogether

What about mouthwash?

Finally, if you use mouthwash, make sure you choose one that’s alcohol-free. Otherwise, you’ll find that your mouth gets dry a few hours after use and you may, therefore, suffer from bad breath! Also, look for products featuring the seal of a recognized dental association. And remember that using mouthwash does not replace brushing and flossing.

The Importance Of Regular Dental Checkups

The Importance Of Regular Dental Checkups

Regular visits to the dentist are indispensable to preserve the health of our teeth and gums. We generally recommend scheduling an appointment every six months.

The routine checkup looks for abnormalities that may affect your oral health. The dentist will look for the presence of tooth decay, dental plaque or tartar on the teeth. Dental plaque is a whitish deposit that adheres to the surface of the teeth. Mainly composed of bacteria, it hardens and transforms into tartar if not eliminated in a timely manner. Unfortunately, at this stage, only a dental professional can solve the problem. If you neglect to do so, various complications threaten to appear sooner or later.

The second phase of the checkup is to examine the gums with an instrument to measure the space between the teeth and the gingiva. If this space is minimal, this means your gums are doing well. On the other hand, if the gap is more pronounced, inflammation is present. Of course, this examination accounts for each patient’s special conditions (eating habits, smoking, saliva characteristics, diabetes, etc.). This is also the moment to share your observations such as a loosen tooth or a change in color, bleeding… Any change in your state of health must be mentioned.

The dental prosthesis, if any, is also examined, as well as the tongue, palate and the inside of the cheeks. Likewise, oral cancer detection tests are available.

The Importance Of Scaling

The Importance Of Scaling

Brushing and flossing your teeth at least twice a day is the best way to get rid of plaque. If it is not completely removed, it hardens and becomes tartar. When this occurs, only a dental professional can remove it.

The role of dental hygienists is to provide therapeutic and preventive care aimed at ensuring optimal oral health. This includes detection, assessment, planning, and prevention to ensure good oral health habits.

After a thorough oral examination, the dental hygienist removes tartar from your teeth with a small, purpose-made metal curette. Once the tartar has been eliminated, the hygienist usually polishes the teeth to clear away any stains visible on the tooth surface using a grainy paste applied to the electric rotary tooth cleaning tool. To also ensure that areas between the teeth have been properly cleaned, the hygienist ends the session with dental floss. The dentist will then perform a complete dental check-up.

Scaling helps prevent certain gum diseases such as gingivitis, but also some problems like chronic halitosis (persistent bad breath). Another reason why professional cleaning should not be overlooked is that despite irreproachable oral hygiene, tartar can accumulate under the gums. If it transforms into advanced gum disease, bacteria can enter the bloodstream and reach other parts of the body.

Since periodontal diseases and untreated gingivitis are the leading cause of tooth loss in patients over 35 years of age, regular cleaning are of utmost importance. Omitting to do so puts your gums at risk for serious problems.

The Importance Of Teeth Restorations

The Importance Of Teeth Restorations

Dental restorations are dedicated to repair damaged or missing tooth structure. Its purpose is of great importance since it avoids degradation of oral health.

Why should we restore a damaged or missing tooth?

  • To allow for proper masticatory function.
  • To prevent any problems that may occur in the absence of intervention.
  • To fill vacant space which stops the migration of neighbouring teeth.
  • To maintain good dental hygiene, which eliminates the plaque and avoids the risk of infection.
  • Tooth restoration embellishes the smile, which has a big impact on confidence and self-esteem.

The Four More Frequent Restorations

Your dental professional may suggest various treatments to replace missing teeth or to restore a damaged tooth. Dental fillings, crowns, implants and prostheses are the most frequent restorations.

Filings remain the number one choice to treat cavities. The bonded restorations are most often used to fill the teeth at the back of the mouth. The composite resin is used to correct various defects caused by cavities, fractures and more. It is generally applied on the visible face of the tooth for aesthetic reasons.

The dental crown is ideal to restore a broken or deformed tooth. It resembles a small hat to completely covers the damaged tooth to strengthen it and improve its aesthetics. It is almost always suggested after root canal treatments to decrease the risk of fracture.

The implant consists of two distinct parts: the screw (or post) at the end of which is built a connector, and the replacement tooth. A variety of implant-supported prostheses are available, such as a dental crown, bridge and complete or partial dentures. This restoration is the closest to natural teeth one can get. It will give you the same confidence, aesthetic and functionality than any natural smile.

A bridge will replace one or more missing teeth. It is permanently affixed to the adjacent teeth using porcelain-covered retainers or metal bands. Once installed, it resembles a natural tooth in all aspects.

Your dentist will guide you through the vast choice of restorations possible and lead you the option that best suits your oral health condition. Never hesitate to ask questions regarding the “how to” of the procedure and what will happen afterward. It will help you in making the right choice.

Do you have a dental insurance?

Do you have a dental insurance?

At our dental office, we will be pleased to assist you in better understanding and managing your insurance coverage. Estimates can be given, upon request, to help you know your coverage and plan your treatment.

Please understand that all insurance contracts are between the insurance company, your employer and you, the subscriber. There are limitations to your dental insurance and very rarely do they cover all dental expenses. The treatment recommended by our team of professionals is based upon your individual needs, not what your insurance coverage will pay.

After the treatment, we will give you the proper forms and information needed to make a claim for reimbursement. Some insurance companies also accept electronic claim transmission and our helpful office administrators will be happy to file your claim for you.

We also remind you that most dental services are free of charge for children under 10, since they are cover by the Régie de l’assurance maladie du Québec.

 

COIN DES PETITS

A Diet for Healthy Teeth

A Diet for Healthy Teeth

The sugary drinks and food we consume change into acid on contact with the bacteria naturally present in our saliva. The acid wears away our tooth enamel and cavities eventually form on our teeth.

Unfortunately, many nutritious drinks and foods contain natural sugar, which is equally damaging to our teeth. For example, milk, fruit juice and most starchy foods (crackers, teething biscuits, etc.) break down into sugar. If these foods remain in our mouth long enough, they transform into acid. Naturally, you cannot cut these foods out of your children’s diet entirely since they contain vitamins and nutrients essential to good growth.

To limit the damage caused by sugar, your role is to keep on top of what your children are eating and supervise how often they brush their teeth. This means taking the time to read the list of ingredients on each product label before putting it in your grocery cart. Foods that contain corn, corn syrup or maple syrup, honey, molasses, fructose, glucose or dextrose-based sweeteners should be used in moderation. Since children love snacks, offer them water before any other beverage. Nuts, cheese and raw vegetables are excellent go-to options, both in terms of oral health and the general health. Fruit juices, soft drinks and candy should be offered sparingly. Careful tooth brushing is advised after eating.

 

One Tooth At A Time

One Tooth At A Time

On average, the first tooth comes in around the age of six months. In most cases, the 20 primary teeth will have completed a full eruption by the toddler’s third year of age. The two lower central incisors are generally the first to come out.

Every child being different, teeth eruptions may go unnoticed or be accompanied by various discomforts or pains.

The most commonly observed signs during a dental flare are:

  • Child salivates a lot
  • Tendency to chew or carry his hands to his mouth
  • Irritability
  • Red cheeks
  • Slightly swollen or reddened gum or presence of a cyst (small blue bubble)

What we recommend for pain relief:

  • Rub the gums with a finger
  • Offer a clean washcloth soaked in cold water to chew
  • Give a refrigerated teething ring (not frozen since it could cause mouth injuries)

Please avoid the following:

  • Gels
  • Teething biscuits
  • Raw vegetables

These may interfere with swallowing as well as being choking hazards.

In no time should you underestimate a fever. A dental breakthrough does not cause fever. If your child is feverish or if his condition is deteriorating, please consult your doctor immediately.

Did you know?

Primary teeth are different from permanent dentition. The dental enamel is notably thinner, which makes it more prone to tooth decay. Hence the importance of adopting healthy habits of oral hygiene at an early stage.

 

CONSEILS POST-OPÉRATOIRES

After minor oral surgery

After minor oral surgery

To speed up the healing process, we strongly suggest following the recommendations outlined below. However, it is perfectly normal to experience some discomfort and swelling after surgery.

On the day of the surgery

  • Apply firm pressure on the compresses and keep them in your mouth for about an hour or two. Change the compresses every 20 to 30 minutes, as needed.
  • Put some ice on your cheek at regular intervals (20 minutes of ice per hour).
  • In case of bleeding, bite down on some gauze or a slightly dampened tea bag for about 20 minutes.

Things to avoid

  • Do not rinse your mouth or spit
  • Do not drink through a straw
  • Do not smoke
  • Do not eat or drink hot food and beverages; choose cool, soft foods instead
  • Do not engage in vigorous activities

Pain

  • During the first 24 to 72 hours following your surgery, take acetaminophen (Tylenol, Atasol), ibuprofen (Motrin, Advil) or the painkillers prescribed to you, but avoid aspirin.
  • Rinse your mouth three times a day with a mixture of warm water and salt (1/2 tsp. of salt in 1 cup of water) the day after the surgery and until healing is complete.
  • Bruises may appear on your skin. They will gradually disappear in five to seven days.
  • You may have difficulty opening your mouth. This discomfort will go away in four to five days.
  • If pain gets worse after three days, do not hesitate to call us.

You should be feeling better and able to resume normal activities within a few days. If you experience pain, excessive bleeding, swelling that lasts two to three days, or a reaction to the prescribed medication, please call us right away at T: 514 739-3461

After a tooth extraction

After a tooth extraction

To speed up the healing process, we strongly suggest following the recommendations outlined below. However, please remember that it is normal to feel some discomfort and to experience swelling in the lower part of your face after a tooth extraction.

On the day of the surgery

  • Keep the compresses in your mouth for an hour or two and apply firm pressure. Change the compresses every 30 minutes, as needed
  • Keep your head upright at all times
  • Apply a cold compress to your cheek at regular intervals (20 minutes an hour)
  • In case of bleeding, bite down on some gauze or a slightly dampened tea bag for about 20 minutes
  • Many patients experience bleeding and notice a reddish tint in their saliva
  • Limit physical activities

Things to avoid

  • Do not remove the scab as it helps to promote healing
  • Do not eat until the bleeding stops
  • Do not drink through a straw
  • Do not rinse your mouth or spit
  • Do not smoke or drink alcohol
  • Do not eat foods that are difficult to chew
  • Do not brush your teeth near the extraction area within 72 hours of the procedure

Pain

Take the medication prescribed to you, as needed. Also, take the antibiotics for the entire duration prescribed, even if you no longer feel any symptoms.

Suggested foods

The day of the extraction, only consume soft foods and warm beverages. Once you feel better, you can eat and drink as you normally would.

Starting the day after the surgery up until you’re fully healed

  • Rinse your mouth three times a day with a mixture of warm water and salt (1/2 tsp. of salt in 1 cup of water)
  • Brush and floss your teeth every day to remove plaque and to ensure better long-term results. Avoid brushing your teeth near the extraction area within 72 hours of the procedure
  • Avoid eating hard food (nuts, candy, ice)
  • It may be difficult for you to pronounce some words and you may have more saliva than usual. You should be back to normal in less than a week.
  • Bruises may appear on your skin. They will gradually disappear in five to seven days
  • You may also have difficulty opening your mouth. This discomfort will go away in about five days
  • If pain gets worse after three days, do not hesitate to call us

You should be feeling better and able to resume normal activities within a few days. If you experience pain, excessive bleeding, swelling that lasts two to three days, or a reaction to the prescribed medication, please call us right away at T: 514 739-3461

After having a crown or bridge installed

After having a crown or bridge installed

To speed up the healing process, we strongly suggest following the instructions outlined below. However, it is perfectly normal to experience some discomfort and swelling after surgery.

Two appointments are needed to install crowns or bridges. During your first visit, we make an impression of the teeth to be replaced. Then, we install temporary crowns or bridges to protect your teeth until the replacement teeth are ready.

On the day of the procedure

  • Take the medication prescribed to you, as needed

Things to avoid

  • Do not drink hot liquids when you’re under anesthesia
  • Do not eat sticky or hard foods (chewing gum, candy)

Suggested foods

  • Chew on the other side of your mouth

Starting the day after the surgery up until you’re fully healed

  • Brush your teeth as you normally would, but be careful when flossing so that the temporary crown doesn’t fall off
  • If the temporary crown comes off, come and see us so that we can cement it back into place. The purpose of the temporary crown is to prevent other teeth from moving and ensure that your permanent crown can be installed properly.

If you experience pain or have questions, call us at T: 514 739-3461